Published by www.noteshare.io

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If you want to get started writing right away, skip to notebooks and creating content now.

1. What is Noteshare?

Noteshare.io is a tool for creating and sharing online notebooks. Here are some examples:

111129135500aR7j
Figure 1. Bird

Notebooks can be for private use, shared with a group, or open to all. Subject matter — educational, literary, artistic, scientific, technical, whatever — depends entirely on your needs and interests. Notebooks are built with the written word — prose, verse, lists, quotes, links to web pages, etc. They can can contain images, other media, and even interactive widgets. (Javascript apps) Mathematical and chemical formulas are also supported (via standard LaTeX): We cannot understand \(\ce{ H2O }\) without the Schrödinger equation:

\[ - \frac{\hbar^2}{2m} \frac{\partial^2 \psi}{\partial x^2}+ V\psi = i\hbar \frac{\partial \psi}{\partial t} \] (1)

(Ask Niels Bohr about that one).

Noteshare also provides tools for cross-referencing, glossaries, an index, and bibliographies. Notebooks can be downloaded to your computer and can, of course, be printed from Noteshare itself.

Not a Blog

Blogs are a great medium for publishing short articles organized by time and perhaps complemented by a system of categories and tags and a search engine. Noteshare addresses the need to publish book-like material on the web, in which material is organized by topic with chapters, sections, and subsections which can be re-organized and re-ordered as the material develops. Noteshare notebooks are online books, and are written in a format (Asciidoc markup) that makes it easy to publish them as a physical book. This format is used, for example, by O’Reilly.

Noteshare also provides tools for tagging and searching, including full-text search. (Some features, such as full-text search, will be limited to paid users at a future date. Be assured that even for pro users, rates will be reasonable. After all, we are writers!)

Your Noteshare.io Account

When you sign up for Noteshare, you get a web paged linked to your screen name. If your screen name is jdoe, then your Noteshare.io site is jdoe.my.noteshare.io. Share the public content of that site using jdoe.my.noteshare.io/public.

There are also non-personal, curated Noteshare sites such as essays.noteshare.io, code.noteshare.io, math.noteshare.io, etc., on which your work can be cross-published. Contact noteshare.io@gmail.com if you are interested in publishing your work on such a site or are interested in setting up such a site.

Markup

Noteshare documents are written in Asciidoc, a markup language. "Markup" means that you add little codes to your text to structure it and shape its appearance. For example, to obtain italic text, you write

    _something like this_

The underscore character _ is the markup code. Boldface is done in a similar way:

    *Boldface*

We explain the basics of markup in the section creating content.`

Your Noteshare.io account comes with a two-pane editor. On the left is the markup — the source text that you write. On the right is the rendered text — the text that your fans read.

As noted above, Noteshare supports mathematical notation. It provides Asciidoc-LaTeX, an extension of Asciidoc. With it, you can produce rendered text like –0—, by writing the markup

    $ a^2 + b^2 = c^2 $

This is standard LaTeX. See mathematics for more information.

Writing

If you want to get started writing, skip to notebooks and creating content now.

Goals and Roadmap

Noteshare.io is still in public beta. Our goals are to provide

  • A tool for writing structured documents

    • with high esthetic value

    • that can transformed automatically into a variety of formats: HTML for the Web, PDF for print, etc.

  • A searchable system for publishing online — one that gives students and teachers, readers and writers a way to find eachother.

  • A system for developing an organized, well-curated, high-quality store of knowledge — from lecture notes to works of art and fiction — that are freely available and in the public domain.

Technology note

Noteshare.io is based on Asciidoctor, a fast and versatile open-source text processing program for the Asciidoc markup language. Asciidoctor is the center of an active ecosystem of text and publishing tools, and is used by organizations such as GitHub and O’Reilly Publishing.

Contact: noteshare.io@gmail.com
This document on Noteshare.io

2. Resources

The aim of this document is to get you up and running with Noteshare.io as quickly as possible. Its scope is therefore deliberately limited. Below we list other resources, some on www.noteshare.io. others at asciidoctor.org.

The markup language used by Noteshare.io is Asciidoc-LaTeX, an extension of Asciidoc. Text is rendered by Asciidoctor, with additional processing by Asciidoctor-LaTeX. Both are open-source projects hosted on GitHub.

3. Getting around Noteshare

3.1. Navigation bar

Screen Shot 2015 08 24 at 4.55.14 PM
Figure 2. Navigation bar

Along the top the screen, you will see the Navigation Bar, with earth-black on the left, site_black on the right, and home_black in the middle.

earth-black Go to the Noteshare.io home page.

home_black Go to your home page.

site_black Go to previous site.

Screen Shot 2015 08 24 at 4.58.50 PM
Figure 3. Search tools

To the right of the Noteshare.io home page icon earth-black are the search tools: a box into which to type one or more key words, and three buttons which determine the type of search. Here are some sample searches:

  • Select notebook, type the word "essay" in the search box, and press the return key. This search brings up notebooks.

  • Select person and type "jdoe", the screen name of a (bogus) user. You will find John Doe’s site. Now type "poetry" or "math" and you will find personal sites having to do with poetry or "math". This search brings up personal sites such as epsilon.my.noteshare.io

  • Select site and type "code" or "essay". You will see a listing of sites having to do with code or essays. This search brings up curated sites such as essays.noteshare.io and math.noteshare.io

Screen Shot 2015 08 24 at 5.17.36 PM
Figure 4. Mode selector

To the right of home_black, you see the Mode Selector bar. At the moment you are in "Browse" mode. Press "Read" to read the current document, and press "Write" to write something in the current document, i.e., to edit it. Press the last button, "Media", to search the media catalogue or to upload items to it.

3.2. Menus

Table 1. Home menu

Help

Display help pages

Last doc

Go to last document viewed

Recent

Show list of recent documents viewed

Public

See your home page as others see it

Tour

Take a tour of Noteshare

Sign out

 — 



Table 2. Noteshare menu

About

About Noteshare.io

Account

A place to change your password

Edit site

Change the appearance of your site



Table 3. View menu

Standard

The standard 3-column view: table of contents, main text, aside

Simple

One-column view: only the main text

Aside

Two-column view: main text and aside

Source

Two-column view: source text and rendered text

Print Sec

Use to print current section

Print Doc

Use to print entire document

Show Doc

Use to view entire document

LaTeX

LaTeX version of current section; use download to download LaTeX version of entire document

3.3. Buttons and keyboard shortcuts

See buttons for buttons and keyboard shortcuts for keyboard shortcuts.

4. Notebooks

Screenshot 2015 09 21 13.14.00
Figure 5. Editing Panel, Top Part

This section describes how to use the tools for creating, editing, and managing notebooks. If you click on the title of one of the notebooks listed on your home page, you will be led to a page which displays the editor control panel. It should look roughly like the control panel in Figure 1. For a short description of what a button does, mouse over it. For a longer description, click on the help tool question.

In what follows, we group the buttons by function — creating a notebook, creating a section, adding an image, etc. The first two are essential, while the remaining ones can be studied at your leisure.

4.1. Create a notebook

To create a notebook and edit its first section, you will need to know how to use just four buttons.

Create

Go the home page and click on new_document to create a document. Fill out the form and press Create. You will be led a page with the controls as displayed in the figure elow.

Edit

The controls for editing a document are displayed in Figure 1 above. Click on edit to edit the current section.

Update

If you are editing text for the current section, click on Screen_Shot_2015-08-21_at_8.39.38_AM to update and save it. The key command Ctrl-U has the same effect.

Exit

Click on Screen_Shot_2015-08-21_at_8.42.01_AM to exit the editor window without saving. The key command Ctrl-X has the same effect.

4.2. Create a new section

To create a new section of a notebook, then publish or share it, use the buttons listed below.

Screenshot 2015 09 21 13.14.00
New section

Click on new and fill out the form to create a new section.

In the form there is a check box labeled "Attach PDF". Check it if you want to upload a PDF file, and then follow directions.

Publish

Click on publish to make the current section public. Click on it again to make it private. If the section is public, the background is green. Anyone can view a public section. Cllick on unlock to make all sections of the current notebook public. Click on it again to make all sections private.

Share

Click on share to share a section with someone by email.

Tip
Mouse over a button in the Editing Panel to view a short description of what it does.

5. Creating Content

Below we show how to write content for Noteshare. For this we use Asciidoc, a versatile and streamlined markup language. Most of what you write will be ordinary text. But here and there you will add little codes to structure it and shape its appearance. For example, italic text is produced by writing –0—, and bold text is produced by writing –1—. To write an numbered list like

  1. Eggs

  2. Flour

  3. Milk

you write

. Eggs
. Flour
. Milk

Just begin each item on a new line with a period. If you like, you can even do mathematical formulas: \(\sqrt{a^2 + b^2}\) is produced from the source text $ \sqrt{a^2 + b^2} $.

We will discuss all this in greater detail below. But for now, the important point to note is that you write source text, from which rendered text is produced:

source text ⇒ rendered text

In this short document, we will not give a complete account of what can be done with Noteshare.io or with Asciidoc. However, one way to learn more is to compare the source and rendered versions of this document. To do this, go to the View menu and choose Source. To return to the usual view, go to View and choose Standard.

5.1. Ordinary text

For ordinary text, just write without regard to line endings. To start a new paragraph, insert a blank line.

Source
Atoms are the building blocks
of matter. The idea goes back to the Greek
philosopher
Democritus.

Democritus viewed atoms as indivisible
units with no parts inside.  We now know
that atoms are made of protons, neutrons,
and electrons.
Rendered

Atoms are the building blocks of matter. The idea goes back to the Greek philosopher Democritus.

Democritus viewed atoms as indivisible units with no parts inside. We now know that atoms are made of protons, neutrons, and electrons.

WARNING: For ordinary text, start writing at the left margin. If you begin a paragraph with a space, you will get verbatim text (see below).

Verbatim text (source)
 This
    is
      a
        test
Verbatim text (rendered)
This
   is
     a
       test

Sometimes you want verbatim text, but usually not.

5.2. Marked up text

As noted above, italic text is produced by writing _italic text_, and bold text is produced by writing *bold text*. Below are some other common markings.

5.2.1. Highlighted and colored text

Psychologists believe that marking up selected parts of a long text improves comprehension and memory. Sometimes the use of color can differentiate different kinds of text.

The source
Psychologists believe that marking up
selected parts of a long text improves
#comprehension and memory#.  Sometimes
the use of color can [blue]#differentiate
different kinds of text#.

5.2.2. Strikethrough

Ms. Grundy made the following correction: "Dear teacher. I ain’t gonna like this class. Can I be excused?"

The source
Ms. Grundy made the following correction:
"Dear teacher. I [line-through]#ain't gonna#
like this class.
Can I be excused?"

5.3. Lists

5.3.1. Numbered Lists

You write a numbered list of errands:

  1. Get groceries

  2. Put gas in the car

  3. Drop a package off at Fedex

Source
. Get groceries
. Put gas in the car
. Drop a package off at Fedex

5.3.2. Bulleted lists

You are writings an outline for a class presentation:

  • Atoms are the building blocks of matter

  • Atoms are very, very small

  • The idea goes back to Democritus, around 500 BC

  • We now know that atoms can be broken down into smaller particles

Source
* Atoms are the building blocks of matter
* Atoms are very, very small
* The idea goes back to Democritus, around 500 BC
* We now know that atoms can be broken down
into smaller particles

Niels Bohr is one of the founders of quantum mechanics.

Source
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niels_Bohr[Niels Bohr]
is one of the founders of quantum mechanics.

Just paste in the link and follow it by a few words enclosed in brackets. Some times the links are so long that you have to choose the Wide option in the Edit menu.

5.4.2. Cross-references

Consider the sentence:

_We first learned about <<Ordinary text>>._

This is a cross-reference to the section titled "Ordinary text". Here is the source:

   _We first learned about <<Ordinary text>>._

We constructed the cross reference by placing the exact title of the section in between double angle brackets. For other ways to make cross-references, see the cross references.

5.5. Images

To upload an image, click on image to upload an image. Fill out the form, choose the image, then press Upload. When the upload is complete, note the ID of the image. For instance, if the ID is 632, you can place an image in your document with image ::632[] or image ::632[width=200].

The image below was inserted using the markup

image ::460[width=200]

Here 460 is the ID number of the image.

111129135500aR7j

You can leave the width of the image undefined:

image ::460[]

Some other variations:

image ::460[width=200, align=center]
image ::460[width=200, float=right]

The example below features an image floated to the right with a caption. The source test is given further on.

111129135500aR7j
Figure 6. Bird

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus interdum at arcu quis finibus. Aliquam posuere, mi sit amet posuere dignissim, leo leo interdum purus, eget congue nunc nisi sit amet augue. Ut urna nunc, condimentum eget pretium ac, feugiat id velit. Nunc vitae dolor quis tellus rhoncus dignissim quis ac nulla. Maecenas congue nisl vitae blandit bibendum. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Morbi auctor accumsan nisl sit amet accumsan. Suspendisse potenti. Nam elementum enim eu vestibulum faucibus. Vivamus ornare diam at posuere egestas.

Source

.Bird
image ::460[width=300, float=right]

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur
adipiscing elit. Vivamus interdum at arcu
quis finibus, ETC.
Note
The text to be floated around the image comes after the image markup.

For audio, use the same button but write the link as audio ::632[]. For video it is best to link to YouTube or vimeo. See adding video in this manual.

5.6. Sections

Sections are indicated like this:

 == Top level section

 Blah, blah

 === Subsection

 Fee, fie, fo fum!

 ==== Subsection

 Ho ho ho!

 ===== Subsubsubsection

 The end!

Sections can be numbered or un-numbered.

Put the code :numbered: in your document to turn numbering on, put :!numbered: to turn it off.

5.7. Blocks

Blocks are used for quotations, poetry, computer code, and much more. The general form of a one-paragraph block is

[header]
TEXT

The general form of a several-paragraph block is

[header]
--
PARAGRAPH 1

PARAGRAPH 2

ETC
--

We illustrate this construction below.

5.7.1. Verse

Poem — one paragraph
’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
      And the mome raths outgrabe.
Source
[verse]
’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
      And the mome raths outgrabe.
Poem — several paragraphs
’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
      And the mome raths outgrabe.

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
      The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
      The frumious Bandersnatch!”
Source
[verse]
--
’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
      And the mome raths outgrabe.

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
      The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
      The frumious Bandersnatch!”
--

5.7.2. Quotations

A man who dares to waste one hour of time has not discovered the value of life.
— Charkes Darwin
The Autobiography of Charles Darwin
Source
[quote, Charkes Darwin, The Autobiography of Charles Darwin, 1809–82]
A man who dares to waste one hour of time has
not discovered the value of life.

5.7.3. Code

Below is a a block of code; note that indentation is preserved:

sum = 0.0
for k in range(1,100):
  sum = sum + 1.0/k
Source
[source, python]
--
sum = 0.0
for k in range(1,100):
  sum = sum + 1.0/k
--

5.8. Tables

Eggs

one dozen

Potatoes

twelve pounds

Milk

three quarts


Source
|===
| Eggs | one dozen
| Potatoes | nine pounds
| Milks | three quarts
|===

6. Writing tools

6.1. Commenting out

Sometimes you may wish to leave text in the source that is not visible in the rendered version. For a single line, do this:

// This section needs to be revised.

For more than one line, you may do this;

////
This article needs a much clearer outline.

Please call Ms. Grundy, the staff editor,
as soon as possible.
////

6.2. Glossary

You can mark terms for a per-section glossary like this:

Screenshot 2015 09 28 00.05.00

In this case, the word potrezebie would be inserted in the glossary that you will find at the end of this section. In the main text, you would find potrezebie set in a dark red color. Look to see if you find any glossary terms on this page. Glossary terms link to their entry in the glossary list and vice versa.

You may also mark a glossary term like this:

Screenshot 2015 09 27 18.41.20

In this case, the phrase "imaginary contraption" appears in the glossary as explanatory text for the term "potrezebie." (We do note, by the way, that there was a time in the previous millennium in which the term potrezebie appeared in certain forms of humorous litereature).

To instruct Noteshare to display the glossary, put the code :glosssary: somewhere in the section — the beginning and the end are good choices. The glossary will appear at the end of the section. Thus, in the present section, the glossary appears at the end of the last subsection — subsection "Export" — take a look at it now.

Note
See Writing Tools for a long example of a glossary.

6.3. Bibliography

Below is a bibliographical citation. The actual bibliography occurs as the last section of this document. When you compile this document using ShowDoc from the View menu, the bibliographical links will be active.

The Cyberiad [cyb], reviewed in [cyb2], recounts the adventures of the robots Trurl and Klaupicius as they explore the universe, encountering all manner of life-forms.

_The Cyberiad_ <<cyb>> recounts the
adventures of the robots Trurl
and Klaupicius as they explore
the universe, encountering
all manner of life-forms.

[bibliography]
- [[[cyb]]] Lem, Stanisław (1975).
The Cyberiad –
fables for the cybernetic age.
translated by Michael Kandel.
United Kingdom: Secker and Warburg.
ISBN 0436244209

6.4. Index

6.4.1. Visible terms

Noteshare will compile an index of terms if (a) you mark them in the text, (b) put the text make_index=yes in the [doc.options] section of document settings. To change the settings, click on the gears tool. To render the document with the index, select Show Doc from the View menu. To mark a word or phrase for inclusion in the index, imitate the example below:

An Screenshot_2015-10-01_06.40.38 is composed of Screenshot_2015-10-01_06.40.46, Screenshot_2015-10-01_06.40.52, and Screenshot_2015-10-01_06.40.59.

The rendered text is as below, with marked terms displayed in red.[1]

An atom is composed of electrons, protons and neutrons.

These terms will appear in the index as

Index
atoms
electrons
neutrons
protons

These terms are hyperlinks to the actual terms in the main text. See the index example, Here is a place to view the source.

6.4.2. Invisible terms

There are several other ways to make index entries. Write Screenshot_2015-10-01_06.39.34 to put "Ancient History" in the index. There result will be an index entry with a link to an invisible point on the page where you wrote Screenshot_2015-10-01_06.39.34. If you write Screenshot_2015-10-01_06.40.02 and Screenshot_2015-10-01_06.40.23, you will see something like

    history
      ancient
      modern

The word history will not be a link, but the words ancient and modern are: they refer to to the place in the text where they were defined. You can also go three deep, as with Screenshot_2015-10-01_06.46.33.

This place the entry history, ancient in the dictionary with a link back to the spot where the reference was made.

The current document has links of all three kinds.

6.5. Export

Noteshare.io does not lock you in. You can export all the files that make up a notebook — text, image, etc. — using the export tool download. When you click on it, you are taken, after a short delay, to a link that gives yo download directions. The download is a compressed archive.

Glossary

bibliographical citation

-

glossary

an alphabetical list of significant words

Klaupicius

robot and constructor; friend of Trurl

potrezebie

imaginary contraption

Trurl

robot and constructor; friend of Klaupicius

7. Teaching tools

Of value to anyone who teaches is the question-answer format of the example below — good for problem sets, course notes with exercise, etc. If you click on the text "Answer" the answer will be revealed. If you click a second time, it will be hidden. Questions are automatically numbered. (You may need to refresh your browser for this feature.)

Question 1.
Who is buried in Grant’s tomb?
Answer
President Ulysses S. Grant
Question 2.
What is the chemical formula for sucrose — cane sugar?
Answer
\[ \ce{C12H22O11 } \]
Question 3.
What is value of the integral \(\int_0^1 x^n dx\)?
Answer
\[ \int_0^1 x^n dx = \frac{1}{n+1} \]

8. Groups and Collaboration

Noteshare groups provide a means of sharing work with collaborators, students, publishers, and others. When your Noteshare account was created, two groups were created — screen_name and screen_name-work. These groups and any others you create are listed in the sidebar of your home page.

With a group you can

  • Add members

  • Add documents

Members can add documents that they have written to the group. They can also determine whether a document is

  • Readable

  • Writeable (i.e., can be edited)

  • Commentable (whether others can comment on it).

8.1. Viewing a group

To see lists of members and document in a group, click on the group name lsited in the right-hand column of the siderar of your home page. You will see something like what is shown in the figure below. The first column consists of the groups image, a short description of the group, and some links. The second column lists the documents in the group, along with their permissions (read, write). The third column list the members of the group.

Screenshot 2015 09 11 08.33.10

To add or remove document or members, or to change the permissions on a notebook, click on Edit Group in the first column. To see a list of all of your groups, click on Show Groups.

8.2. Managing a group

When you click on Edit Group as described above, you are transported to the Group Editor, as in the figure below. The second and third columns are as before, while the fist column has a set of tools — forms that you fill out — to manage your group. We describe these tools below.

Screenshot 2015 09 11 08.44.42
Add/remove member

Put the ID or screen name of a user in the white box and press return. If the user was not a member of the group, he is added. If we was a member of the group, he is removed. Not removed from the system, but just from this group.

Add/remove notebook

Put the ID or "handle" of a notebook in the white box and press return. If the notebook was not a member of the group, it is added. If the notebook was a member of the group, it is removed. Not removed from the system, but just from this group.

About handles

A handle is anything that identifies one notebook and one notebook only. The ID is a handle. In many cases, a word from the title is a handle in the universe of documents written by you. In those cases, one or more of the title words ask as a handle.

Change privileges

Use the third gray box from the top to change wh can: o read, edit, and comment on a notebook. Check the boxes you want, enter the ID or handle of the notebook, and click on Update.

Description

Use the fourth gray box from the top to change the Group description — a short bit of text explaining the purpose of your group.

Image

The last gray box is used to set the image displayed on the group view and edit pages Enter the ID of the image.

8.3. Checking documents out

A document shared with a group that is "writeable" can be edited by anyone in the group. To avoid mishaps coming from two people editing a section at the same time, you can check the document. Do this by clicking on the button checkout in the main view window. No one but you can edit that section until you check it back in. Do this by clicking on checkout again.

9. Other Features

Sharing

Use the share tool to bring up an email with a reference to the current notebook.

Compiling

Choose Compile in the View menu to display a compiled version of the current notebook. The compiled version assembles all sections of the current notebook in a single web-compatible document. It may be printed or printed to PDF.

Search

Use the grey box in the menu bar to search for notebooks, public Notehsare.io sites, or the Noteshare.io sites of individuals. Search by keyword, screen name, site name, title, tag, etc.

10. Mathematics

The Asciidoc markup language has an extension, Asciidoc-LaTeX, which offers many of the features of LaTeX. These include formulas delimited by dollar signs and double dollar signs, an analogue of LaTeX environments, and the use of an authors own macros.

10.1. Inline and displayed formulas

In-line mathematical formulas like \( a^2 + b^2 = c^2 \) are written like this:

$ a^2 + b^2 = c^2 $.

Use standard LaTeX notation. For displayed mathematical text like \[ \int_0^1 x^n dx, \] you can use

 \[
    \int_0^1 x^n dx.
 \]

or

 $$
    \int_0^1 x^n dx.
 $$

10.2. Theorems

For automatically numbered theorems such as

Theorem 1.
There are infinitely many prime numbers

use the source text

[env.theorem]
--
There are infinitely many prime numbers
--

Note the parallel with LaTeX environments. Thus one has [env.definition], [env.lemma], etc.,

Consider next this example:

Theorem 2.
If \(a\), \(b\), and \(c\) are the sides of a right triangle, where \(c\) is the hypotenuse, then \(a^2 + b^2 = c^2\).
Source
[env.theorem#th-pythagoras]
--
If $a$, $b$, and $c$ are the sides
of a right triangle, where $c$
is the hypotenuse, then
$a^2 + b^2 = c^2$.
--

The body of the theorem environment can contain ordinary LaTeX. The text after the hash mark (#) is a label (LaTeX terminology) or an id (Asciidoc terminology). It is used for cross-referencing. Consider the source text

Hey, Theorem 2 is attributed to Pythagoras!

The source for this sentence is

Hey, <<th-pythagoras>> is attributed to Pythagoras!

10.3. Equation environment

Displayed equations can be automatically numbered and cross-referenced. For the equation below

\[ \sum_{n=1}^\infty \frac{1}{n} = \infty, \] (2)

the source is

[env.equation#eq-harmonic-series]
--
\sum_{n=1}^\infty \frac{1}{n} = \infty
--

Now consider the paragraph below:

The result in equation 2 was known to the medieval Scholastic philosopher Nicole Oresme (c. 1320–1325 – July 11, 1382). See Wikepedia.

In the source below, note how the cross-reference is made. In this case the reference text is equation 1. That will be the form if the label (id) has the form eq-whatever. For a more standard alternative, continue reading.

The result in <<eq-harmonic-series>>
was known to the medieval Scholastic philosopher
Nicole Oresme (c. 1320–1325 – July 11, 1382).
See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicole_Oresme[Wikepedia].

Consider next the equation alignment

\[\begin{split} (a + b)^2 &= a^2 + 2ab + b^2 \\ (a + b)^3 &= a^3 + 3a^2b + 3ab^2 + b^3 \end{split}\] (3)

The source is

[env.equationalign#binomials]
--
  (a + b)^2  &= a^2 + 2ab + b^2 \\
 (a + b)^3  &= a^3 + 3a^2b + 3ab^2 + b^3
--

Here is a sentence which refers to the formulas:

The formulas in (<<binomials>>) are well-known.

If we do not prefix the label by eq-, then a numerical piece of cross-referencing text will be produced.

10.4. Macros

There are two ways to use your own macros in Noteshare. The first way applies the macro definitions within a single section, whereas the second applies to the whole notebook.

10.4.1. Section macros

To define TeX macros in the text of a document, imitate this example:

[env.texmacro]
--
\def\QQ{\mathbb{Q}}
\def\ZZ{\mathbb{Z}}
\newcommand{\sett}[2]{ \{\,#1\, \mid\, #2\, \} }
--
\( \def\QQ{\mathbb{Q}} \def\ZZ{\mathbb{Z}} \newcommand{\sett}[2]{ \{\,#1\, \mid\, #2\, \} } \)

Then you say

$ \QQ = \sett{a/b}{a, b \in \ZZ, \ b \ne 0} $

to get

\( \QQ = \sett{a/b}{a, b \in \ZZ, \ b \ne 0} \).

10.4.2. Notebook Macros

This section applies to Noteshare.io only.

Screenshot 2015 09 21 13.14.00
Figure 7. Editor control panel

It is usually more convenient to define macros in such a way that they can be used for an entire noteobook. To do this, imitate the example below, which comes from the Notebook Attributes field. To access this field, click on the gears button of the editor control panel.

[doc.texmacros]
--
\def\QQ{\mathbb{Q}}
\def\ZZ{\mathbb{Z}}
\newcommand{\sett}[2]{ \{\,#1\, \mid\, #2\, \} }
--

Please plural form doc.texmacros.

Bibliography

Index


1. The display style — red, something else, or nothing at all, can be changed by modifying the document stylesheet.